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How will advanced mixed reality impact our everyday lives?

A persistent, uber-personalised view of the world

An illustration of a coloured lens around a pupil, and graphics showing information going into the lenz from social media profiles and eye-tracking

If you could, would you apply Facebook and Snapchat filters to your sight? If the overcast day brought down your mood, would you choose a sunny day filter? What about the rows of buildings outside your bedroom window — would you prefer to wake up to the sparkling view of a giant waterfall? And the endless concrete covering the city, would you prefer it covered in lush green?

What if every day you could see and interact with a version of the world you preferred— a unique view personalised for you according to what makes you happy—all with a few blinks and eye movements?

The Maya Lenz is a blink-controlled, augmented reality contact lens concept that immerses users in a persistent, uber-personalised view of the world with 100% field of vision, 24 hrs a day.

An view of people and homeless on a street, the sene blinks and the people become avatras, the bridge i smade beautiful, the sky brighter, and the homeless are hidden

Design fiction synopsis

The Lenz is an advanced contact lens administered via eye-drop liquid containing bio-compatible nano-materials that ‘colonise’ the Lenz on the eye.

Combining AR, soft robotics, and invisible computing, the Lenz connects to other wearables, such as smartwatches, to offset processing power and remain cool. Reconfigurable, the nano hardware can be updated via wi fi just as its software can be, enabling the Lenz to be worn 24/7 and the augmentation of one’s view to be enjoyed uninterrupted through all waking moments.

As well as standard filters and default displays, such as weather and directional information, the Lenz’s key feature is the Mirage—an automated, personalised filter that alters the user’s view to show them more of what they want to see and less of what they don’t.

Insight summary

  1. Blink-controlled interaction usability principles
  2. A potential 4th Extended Reality (VR, AR, MR) called AltR (Alternate Reality) created when MR tech is so advanced wearers see completely different augmentations of the same reality and yet are able to interact with each other as the different augmentations follow the same spatial dimensions and physics.
  3. Potential for uber-filtering of reality resulting in the exclusion of others and enabling denial
  4. Potential for wearer’s enhanced alignment with values

Design Fictions produced

  1. Blink interaction simulation video
  2. Lenz filter sampler
  3. Lenz product webpage
  4. Short story
  5. Sci fi novel

Insight #1—Blink-control interaction priniplces

Full article on Medium

A mapping of design and usability principles for blink-controlled tech

Insight #2—AltR, a 4th Extended Reality

Read more on Medium

An illustration showing the difference between VR, AR, MR and Alt-R

Design fiction #1—Blink interaction simulation video

Design fiction #2—Lenz filter sampler

Design fiction #3—Future Product Web Page

The Maya Lenz

Design fiction #4—Sci-fi novel

The Maya Lenz featured in The Lenz, a speculative sci-fi novel exploring a near future where people immerse themselves in uber-personalised augmented vision to hide the impacts of climate change happening all around them.

Design fiction #5—Short story

A short story exploring a Lenz wearer’s experience—see the “Welcome to 2040” chapter in this article.

Design articles

Will augmented reality show us a better future or blind us to it?

Exploring a future where projected behaviour trends collide with advanced, fully-immersive augmented reality

Exploring a future AR interface controlled only by blinks and eye movements

A persistent, uber-personalised view of the world

An illustration of a coloured lens around a pupil, and graphics showing information going into the lenz from social media profiles and eye-tracking

If you could, would you apply Facebook and Snapchat filters to your sight? If the overcast day brought down your mood, would you choose a sunny day filter? What about the rows of buildings outside your bedroom window — would you prefer to wake up to the sparkling view of a giant waterfall? And the endless concrete covering the city, would you prefer it covered in lush green?

What if every day you could see and interact with a version of the world you preferred— a unique view personalised for you according to what makes you happy—all with a few blinks and eye movements?

The Maya Lenz is a blink-controlled, augmented reality contact lens concept that immerses users in a persistent, uber-personalised view of the world with 100% field of vision, 24 hrs a day.

An view of people and homeless on a street, the sene blinks and the people become avatras, the bridge i smade beautiful, the sky brighter, and the homeless are hidden

Design fiction synopsis

The Lenz is an advanced contact lens administered via eye-drop liquid containing bio-compatible nano-materials that ‘colonise’ the Lenz on the eye.

Combining AR, soft robotics, and invisible computing, the Lenz connects to other wearables, such as smartwatches, to offset processing power and remain cool. Reconfigurable, the nano hardware can be updated via wi fi just as its software can be, enabling the Lenz to be worn 24/7 and the augmentation of one’s view to be enjoyed uninterrupted through all waking moments.

As well as standard filters and default displays, such as weather and directional information, the Lenz’s key feature is the Mirage—an automated, personalised filter that alters the user’s view to show them more of what they want to see and less of what they don’t.

Insight summary

  1. Blink-controlled interaction usability principles
  2. A potential 4th Extended Reality (VR, AR, MR) called AltR (Alternate Reality) created when MR tech is so advanced wearers see completely different augmentations of the same reality and yet are able to interact with each other as the different augmentations follow the same spatial dimensions and physics.
  3. Potential for uber-filtering of reality resulting in the exclusion of others and enabling denial
  4. Potential for wearer’s enhanced alignment with values

Design Fictions produced

  1. Blink interaction simulation video
  2. Lenz filter sampler
  3. Lenz product webpage
  4. Short story
  5. Sci fi novel

Insight #1—Blink-control interaction priniplces

Full article on Medium

A mapping of design and usability principles for blink-controlled tech

Insight #2—AltR, a 4th Extended Reality

Read more on Medium

An illustration showing the difference between VR, AR, MR and Alt-R

Design fiction #1—Blink interaction simulation video

Design fiction 2—Lenz filter sampler

Design fiction #3—Future Product Web Page

The Maya Lenz

Design fiction #4—Sci-fi novel

The Maya Lenz featured in The Lenz, a speculative sci-fi novel exploring a near future where people immerse themselves in uber-personalised augmented vision to hide the impacts of climate change happening all around them.

Design articles

Will augmented reality show us a better future or blind us to it?

Exploring a future where projected behaviour trends collide with advanced, fully-immersive augmented reality

Exploring a future AR interface controlled only by blinks and eye movements

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